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US: Trump wins US election but loses popular votes

10th Nov 2016
US: Trump wins US election but loses popular votes

By Esra Kaymak Avci

 

WASHINGTON (AA) – Though he received 210,000 less votes than Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump became the president-elect by winning more than 270 electoral delegates, a must to become the president. Americans took to the streets across the country late Wednesday after Donald Trump won a stunning victory against Hillary Clinton in the presidential race.

Trump is the first person in 60 years to become president without any political experience. He received 59.4 million to 59.4 million for Clinton.

Although Clinton had more votes, Trump became the president due to the winner-take-all system in the U.S., in which a candidate who receives the most votes in a state gets all of the electoral delegates from that state. The total number of electoral college delegates is 538. A candidate needs 270 delegates in order to become president.

Each state receives a number of delegates, depending on the number of congressional representatives in that state.

Trump’s unexpected victory was facilitated by wins in swing states such as Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania and North Carolina, but also in Arizona and Wisconsin where the race was tight. Some media reports said Trump succeeded in 29 states and increased his number of electoral delegates to 290.

On the other hand, Clinton won 19 states, including the U.S. capital, and received only 228 delegates.

Another important highlight of Trump’s victory was that 58 percent of white Americans voted for the Republican, according to exit polls. On the other hand, Clinton received only 37 percent votes of the white Americans.

Trump received 29 percent of Hispanic support although he has proposed to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border do prevent undocumented immigrants from entering the country.

Meanwhile, Americans took to the streets across the country late Wednesday after Donald Trump won a stunning victory against Hillary Clinton in the presidential race.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 9 : Protestors gather outside Trump Tower during a protest against President-elect Donald Trump of Republican Party in New York, United States on November 9, 2016.  ( Mohammed Elshamy - Anadolu Agency )
[Protestors gather outside Trump Tower during a protest against President-elect Donald Trump of Republican Party in New York, United States on November 9, 2016. ( Mohammed Elshamy – Anadolu Agency )]

Chants of “not my president” were heard as street protests marked citizen discontent with the results of the election in cities in California, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Washington state, Chicago and New York City.

In the Big Apple, thousands occupied Fifth Avenue, chanting, “Hey, hey, ho, ho, Donald Trump has got to go”.

The peaceful march began at Union Square, the epicenter of New York City black lives matter protests during the summer, and continued about 3 miles north to Trump Tower, the headquarters of the successful Republican campaign to the White House.

Hundreds of Clinton supporters protested after the election results were announced overnight Tuesday. Demonstrators in Portland, Oregon, were recorded setting fire to an American flag and shouting obscenities at the new president-elect.

[Photo: Republican President-elect Donald Trump. Photographer: Samuel Corum/AA]

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